area guiding

explore brighton & hove with Brand Vaughan

kemp town

Kemp Town is the area to the east of Brighton Pier, with the Old Steyne to the west and Sussex Square to the east, and north to Eastern Road

+getting around
Kemp Town has a 20ish minute walk into the city centre, a 5-10 minute walk to the sea and a 5 minute drive to the Marina and the South Downs.

The no7 bus goes directly to Brighton station every 5-10 minutes and takes 15-20 minutes, and the no 1 goes all the way west to Hove

+the housing
Kemp Town includes some magnificent architecture, with street after street of white stucco Georgian terraces, including the magnificent Sussex Square, Lewes Crescent, Royal Crescent and, stretching along the seafront, Marine Parade – considered one of the finest examples of seafront architecture in the UK.

Many of these have of course been converted to flats, often with large and high-ceilinged rooms, but the odd house still can be found, especially in streets like College Gardens and Great College Street

+the lifestyle

The area around St George’s Road has a distinctly village feel. Some might bemoan its gentrification – all architectural reclamation, vintage clothing, delis and things-for-the-home type shops. But there are also still local mainstay butcher, greengrocer, bookshop, post office, chemist and a few good local pubs and places to eat. with a great selection of little shops, selling most of what you’d want: an award-winning butcher, a greengrocers, a bank, co-op, a few pubs including the rather nice Ginger Dog, lots of cafes, a couple of restaurants, a bookshop… Oh, and an award-winning estate agent called Brand Vaughan!

To the west lies St James’s Street, which has a more vibrant feel and is popular with the gay community. It is lined with many cafes, delis, pubs and some good restaurants and a small Tesco, Sainsbury’s and larger Morrisons. A couple of large blocks of council flats are to be found here too.

Kemp Town remains enduring popular because of its buzzy feel, but also because it is so close to the sea. The Royal Sussex County Hospital is located in Kemp Town too.

+the schools

Primary

  • Queen’s Park Primary
  • St Luke’s Primary
  • St John the Baptist (RC) Primary

Secondary

  • Dorothy Stringer
  • Varndean

Private schools

  • Brighton College
  • Roedean
  • Brighton Steiner Schoo

hove

Officially Hove has Boundary Road in the west, Montpelier Road in the east, the A27 to the north and the sea to the south.

+getting around
Trains run frequently from Hove station to Gatwick, to London Victoria and London Bridge and along the coast to Worthing, Chichester and Southampton. Buses run along the main routes to the station, and into the city centre.

Aldrington and Portslade also serve these, but less frequently.

+the housing
On the seafront are large Regency stucco mansion blocks, and some magnificent squares, like Brunswick Square and Adelaide Crescent, most of which have been converted into flats with large rooms, high ceilings and use of the shared garden squares.

Further north, between Western Road and Old Shoreham Road are good sized handsome Edwardian houses, with 3 to 5 beds in the main, and gardens slightly larger than in Brighton.

Above Old Shoreham Road is Hove Park – the area between here and Dyke Road Avenue. It is an affluent area of mainly 1930s large family homes, (often mock Tudor), and some built more recently. Many houses here have their own drive and good sized gardens.

Further west now to Portland Road. South of here you’ll find larger 4+ bed family homes – splendid Edwardian and 30s semis and some detached houses, with good sized gardens.

North of Portland Road, in roads such as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron and Shakespeare streets – hence its common nickname of ‘Poets’ Corner’, are smaller Victorian houses, popular with young families.

+the lifestyle
Hove is a very popular area with families, because of its closeness to the sea, good houses, and its slightly more gentle feel than Brighton. The seafront has a great playground, lido, cafes and restaurants, and the beach of course. The busy Western Road and Church Road run through the area, abounding with restaurants, cafes, pubs and bars, and the pedestrianised George Street at the far end of Church Street is popular.

The parks are well maintained, especially the lovely St Ann’s Well Garden and Hove Park, both of which have tennis courts and a good café.

+the schools
Primary:

  • Davigdor Infants
  • Somerhill Junior
  • St Andrew’s (CE)
  • Cottesmore St Mary’s Primary (RC)
  • West Hove Infants and Junior Schools

Secondary catchment

  • Cardinal Newman (RC)
  • Hove Park
  • Blatchington Mill

Private Schools:

  • St Christopher’s
  • Deepdene
  • The Drive
  • Lancing at Mowden

+we recommend
There are some fantastic bars, restaurants and shops in Hove, take a look at our favourites.

barcode cafe - bar - restaurant Barcode (Hove) restaurant offers a fusion of American & Italian food. New York Italian with an extensive food menu from early morning til late at night.

barcode

cafe – bar – restaurant

Barcode (Hove) restaurant offers a fusion of American & Italian food. New York Italian with an extensive food menu from early morning til late at night.

barcode cafe - bar - restaurant Barcode (Hove) restaurant offers a fusion of American & Italian food. New York Italian with an extensive food menu from early morning til late at night.

barcode

cafe – bar – restaurant

Barcode (Hove) restaurant offers a fusion of American & Italian food. New York Italian with an extensive food menu from early morning til late at night.

 

 

preston park and fiveways

Home of our 2nd office, Preston Park lies immediately to the north of the city centre, as you head out of town towards London on the A23, with Fiveways just up the hill to the east, at the junction of Ditchling Road, Preston Drove, and locally known as the Golden Triangle because of its good housing, nice park and access to good schools.

+getting around
This area is well served for public transport, with Preston Park station offering trains north to Gatwick and London, and also west along the coast. The city centre is a 5 minute drive away, the seafront a shade more, and buses there are frequent. Access to the A23 and A27 are good from here also.

+the housing
Housing around here is mainly Victorian 3- and 4-bed terraced houses, with small but usable gardens. Towards Preston Park itself you’ll find larger Victorian and Edwardian houses, some double fronted and many with good- sized gardens. West of Surrenden Road are detached houses built from the 1930s onwards, with semi-detached and chalet-style bungalows too.

There are a few shops near the station, and a useful selection up the hill at Fiveways – a bank, a couple of delis, a co-op and so on.

+the lifestyle
Preston Park is an area popular with families because of the park itself which is large, with a playground (albeit slightly tired now), café, tennis courts, bowls and a cricket pitch, but mainly because of the good family housing and good primaries and secondaries nearby.

It’s also popular with commuters because it’s close to Preston Park station.

The area therefore feels like a nice, happy family area.

+the schools
Primary:

  • St Bernadette’s Primary (RC)
  • Balfour Junior
  • Hertford Infant
  • St Joseph’s (RC)
  • Downs Infants and Juniors

Secondary catchments

East of Preston Road, and south of Peacock Lane / Surrenden Road

  • Dorothy Stringer
  • Varndean

West of London Road, and north of Peacock Lane / Surrenden Road

  • Patcham High
  • Dorothy Stringer
  • Varndean

queens park and hanover

Queen’s Park can be considered to be the area between the Royal Sussex County Hospital in the east, to Queen’s Park Road in the west, south to Eastern Road, and north to the top of Freshfield Road. West of this, down to Lewes Road is what’s generally known as Hanover.

+getting around
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+the housing
Housing around here is mainly Victorian 3- and 4-bed terraced houses, with small but usable gardens. Towards Preston Park itself you’ll find larger Victorian and Edwardian houses, some double fronted and many with good- sized gardens. West of Surrenden Road are detached houses built from the 1930s onwards, with semi-detached and chalet-style bungalows too.

There are a few shops near the station, and a useful selection up the hill at Fiveways – a bank, a couple of delis, a co-op and so on.

+the lifestyle
The Park itself is a wonderful area, a bowl-shaped park with a pond, tennis courts, playground and dog-walking area, and it has the odd fete or show in the summer.

The area feels like a nice family area, with plenty of children making their way to the good primaries in the area.

+the schools
Primary

  • Queen’s Park Primary
  • St Luke’s Primary
  • St John the Baptist (RC) Primary

Elm Grove Primary

  • Fairlight Primary

Secondary

  • Dorothy Stringer
  • Varndean

Private schools

  • Brighton College
  • Roedean
  • Brighton Steiner School

seven dials and clifton

The ‘Seven Dials area’ and Clifton conservation area lies immediately west of Brighton Station – roads such as Compton Avenue, West Hill, Vernon Terrace.

+getting around
The area is well served for transport, being so close to Brighton station, plus plenty of buses to all parts of the city. About 20 minutes’ walk to the sea, and 10-15 minutes to city centre.

+the housing
Lots of white stucco Georgian houses make up the Clifton Conservation Area, with plenty of Victorian cottages and three beds there too. Nice stuff.

+the lifestyle
Seven Dials and Clifton have a village feel to them with a sense of community but with a city buzz. Independently run ‘lifestyle’ shops, delis, cafes, bars and some good restaurants, including the excellent Sam’s restaurant (great brunch). Like Kemp Town, this is a desirable area, fast becoming the Chelsea of Brighton.

+the schools

Primary

  • St Paul’s CE Primary
  • St Mary Magdalen RC Primary
  • Davigdor School

Secondary

  • Cardinal Newman RC
  • Blatchington Mill School

Private schools

  • Lancing College at Mowden
  • Brighton & Hove High School
  • Brighton College

central brighton and north laine

This is the city centre proper – general speaking from Old Steine in the east to Montpelier Rd in the west, and as far north as the station.

+getting around
The station is very close to hand, with trains north to the London and Gatwick, and west along the coast. Buses go to all parts of the city. Parking is hell, but as you have so much close by, is a car really necessary…?! Laines is perfectly positioned centrally, for walking everywhere. Ten minutes’ walk from the seafront.

+the housing
Not a vast amount of housing here, being the city centre, but what there is, tends to be 2 or 3 bed cottages in Victorian or Regency terraces. New development, City Point, up by the station, offers modern apartments,

+the lifestyle
Well, living in the centre of Brighton needs no introduction. Everything you know and love about Brighton is right here, on your doorstep including the fabulous award winning Jubilee Library, the swimming pool, the Brighton Dome and Theatre Royal, Pavilion and everything the city centre has to offer.

+the schools
Primary schools:

  • Middle Street
  • St Bartholomew’s Primary (CE)
  • St Mary Magdalen Primay (RC)
  • St Paul’s Primary (CE)
  • Stanford Primary

Secondary catchment (Sep 08 intake)

  • Dorothy Stringer
  • Varndean

 

roedean

Roedean is the area just north of Brighton Marina, east of Wilson Avenue.

+getting around
where is Roedean?

+the housing
Almost without exception you’ll find large detached houses, sometimes complete with a swimming pool and gated entrance. Some properties have been heavily modernised into ‘Grand Designs’ style properties. Slightly west of here, along Wilson Avenue and the road off it, you’ll find 3 and 4 bed housing from the 1920s and 30s.

+the lifestyle
This feels like an upmarket residential area, perhaps one with slight pretensions of Beverley Hills! It’s a small area though, and a good selection of local shops on Whitehawk Road and at the Marina, and plenty of sea air and views of the Downs stretching behind. Take to the Marina for the Seattle Hotel, bar and restaurant, and a pizza overlooking the boats. The excellent Brighton College and Roedean girls school are nearby, and popular with residents here.

+the schools
Primary

  • Whitehawk Primary

Secondary

  • Longhill School. Ovingdean

Private schools

  • Brighton College
  • Roedean school for girls
  • Brighton Steiner School